Tambora

Author: Gillen D’Arcy Wood
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400851408
File Size: 17,69 MB
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When Indonesia's Mount Tambora erupted in 1815, it unleashed the most destructive wave of extreme weather the world has witnessed in thousands of years. The volcano’s massive sulfate dust cloud enveloped the Earth, cooling temperatures and disrupting major weather systems for more than three years. Communities worldwide endured famine, disease, and civil unrest on a catastrophic scale. Here, Gillen D’Arcy Wood traces Tambora’s global and historical reach: how the volcano’s three-year climate change regime initiated the first worldwide cholera pandemic, expanded opium markets in China, and plunged the United States into its first economic depression. Bringing the history of this planetary emergency to life, Tambora sheds light on the fragile interdependence of climate and human societies to offer a cautionary tale about the potential tragic impacts of drastic climate change in our own century.

Island On Fire The Extraordinary Story Of A Forgotten Volcano That Changed The World

Author: Alexandra Witze
Publisher: Pegasus Books
ISBN: 1605987352
File Size: 23,48 MB
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Can a single explosion change the course of history? An eruption at the end of the 18th century led to years of climate change while igniting famine, disease, even perhaps revolution. Laki is one of Iceland’s most fearsome volcanoes. Laki is Iceland’s largest volcano. Its eruption in 1783 is one of history’s great, untold natural disasters. Spewing out sun-blocking ash and then a poisonous fog for eight long months, the effects of the eruption lingered across the world for years. It caused the deaths of people as far away as the Nile and created catastrophic conditions throughout Europe. Island on Fire is the story not only of a single eruption but the people whose lives it changed, the dawn of modern volcanology, as well as the history—and potential—of other super-volcanoes like Laki around the world. And perhaps most pertinently, in the wake of the eruption of another Icelandic volcano, Eyjafjallajökull, which closed European air space in 2010, acclaimed science writers Witze and Kanipe look at what might transpire should Laki erupt again in our lifetime.

Eruptions That Shook The World

Author: Clive Oppenheimer
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139496395
File Size: 41,44 MB
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What does it take for a volcanic eruption to really shake the world? Did volcanic eruptions extinguish the dinosaurs, or help humans to evolve, only to decimate their populations with a super-eruption 73,000 years ago? Did they contribute to the ebb and flow of ancient empires, the French Revolution and the rise of fascism in Europe in the 19th century? These are some of the claims made for volcanic cataclysm. Volcanologist Clive Oppenheimer explores rich geological, historical, archaeological and palaeoenvironmental records (such as ice cores and tree rings) to tell the stories behind some of the greatest volcanic events of the past quarter of a billion years. He shows how a forensic approach to volcanology reveals the richness and complexity behind cause and effect, and argues that important lessons for future catastrophe risk management can be drawn from understanding events that took place even at the dawn of human origins.

Tambora

Author: Kathy Furgang
Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group
ISBN: 082395661X
File Size: 76,92 MB
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Explains how this volcano was formed, the devastation it caused, what scientists have learned from it.

Krakatoa

Author: Simon Winchester
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141926236
File Size: 21,85 MB
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Simon Winchester's brilliant chronicle of the destruction of the Indonesian island of Krakatoa in 1883 charts the birth of our modern world. He tells the story of the unrecognized genius who beat Darwin to the discovery of evolution; of Samuel Morse, his code and how rubber allowed the world to talk; of Alfred Wegener, the crack-pot German explorer and father of geology. In breathtaking detail he describes how one island and its inhabitants were blasted out of existence and how colonial society was turned upside-down in a cataclysm whose echoes are still felt to this day.

Volcanoes In Human History

Author: Jelle Zeilinga de Boer
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400842859
File Size: 79,84 MB
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When the volcano Tambora erupted in Indonesia in 1815, as many as 100,000 people perished as a result of the blast and an ensuing famine caused by the destruction of rice fields on Sumbawa and neighboring islands. Gases and dust particles ejected into the atmosphere changed weather patterns around the world, resulting in the infamous ''year without a summer'' in North America, food riots in Europe, and a widespread cholera epidemic. And the gloomy weather inspired Mary Shelley to write the gothic novel Frankenstein. This book tells the story of nine such epic volcanic events, explaining the related geology for the general reader and exploring the myriad ways in which the earth's volcanism has affected human history. Zeilinga de Boer and Sanders describe in depth how volcanic activity has had long-lasting effects on societies, cultures, and the environment. After introducing the origins and mechanisms of volcanism, the authors draw on ancient as well as modern accounts--from folklore to poetry and from philosophy to literature. Beginning with the Bronze Age eruption that caused the demise of Minoan Crete, the book tells the human and geological stories of eruptions of such volcanoes as Vesuvius, Krakatau, Mount Pelée, and Tristan da Cunha. Along the way, it shows how volcanism shaped religion in Hawaii, permeated Icelandic mythology and literature, caused widespread population migrations, and spurred scientific discovery. From the prodigious eruption of Thera more than 3,600 years ago to the relative burp of Mount St. Helens in 1980, the results of volcanism attest to the enduring connections between geology and human destiny. Some images inside the book are unavailable due to digital copyright restrictions.

Historical Perspectives On Climate Change

Author: James Rodger Fleming
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199885095
File Size: 44,65 MB
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This intriguing volume provides a thorough examination of the historical roots of global climate change as a field of inquiry, from the Enlightenment to the late twentieth century. Based on primary and archival sources, the book is filled with interesting perspectives on what people have understood, experienced, and feared about the climate and its changes in the past. Chapters explore climate and culture in Enlightenment thought; climate debates in early America; the development of international networks of observation; the scientific transformation of climate discourse; and early contributions to understanding terrestrial temperature changes, infrared radiation, and the carbon dioxide theory of climate. But perhaps most important, this book shows what a study of the past has to offer the interdisciplinary investigation of current environmental problems.

Volcano Weather

Author: Henry M. Stommel
Publisher:
ISBN:
File Size: 55,63 MB
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Examines the influence of the eruption of the Indonesian volcano, Mount Tambora, on the weather conditions in Europe and New England.

The Volcano That Changed The World

Author: James W. Mercer
Publisher: Lulu.com
ISBN: 9781300737704
File Size: 57,24 MB
Format: PDF
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An attempted murder at the Florida State University ice core laboratory leaves geology professor Mark Malloy wondering who wants him dead and if they will try again. Fortunately, Mark is leaving for the Greek island of Santorini to spend the summer resolving the mystery surrounding the lost island of Atlantis. He believes Atlantis' fate is linked to the mysterious annihilation of the advanced Minoan Empire, the cradle of European civilization, on the island of Crete. While studying the Thera volcanic eruption on Santorini, Mark teams with Greek archeologist, Alexandra Papadopulos. As the summer field season draws to an end, he must return home to face the unknown person who wants him dead.

Romanticism And Music Culture In Britain 1770 1840

Author: Gillen D'Arcy Wood
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 052111733X
File Size: 68,39 MB
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This book surveys the role of music in British culture throughout the long Romantic period.