Making Sense Of Weather And Climate

Author: Mark Denny
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231542860
File Size: 73,24 MB
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How do meteorologists design forecasts for the next day’s, the next week’s, or the next month’s weather? Are some forecasts more likely to be accurate than others, and why? Making Sense of Weather and Climate takes readers through key topics in atmospheric physics and presents a cogent view of how weather relates to climate, particularly climate-change science. It is the perfect book for amateur meteorologists and weather enthusiasts, and for anyone whose livelihood depends on navigating the weather’s twists and turns. Making Sense of Weather and Climate begins by explaining the essential mechanics and characteristics of this fascinating science. The noted physics author Mark Denny also defines the crucial differences between weather and climate, and then develops from this basic knowledge a sophisticated yet clear portrait of their relation. Throughout, Denny elaborates on the role of weather forecasting in guiding politics and other aspects of human civilization. He also follows forecasting’s effect on the economy. Denny’s exploration of the science and history of a phenomenon we have long tried to master makes this book a unique companion for anyone who wants a complete picture of the environment’s individual, societal, and planetary impact.

Making The Most Of The Anthropocene

Author: Mark Denny
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 1421423006
File Size: 27,89 MB
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Ever since Nobel Prize–winning atmospheric chemist Paul Crutzen coined the term "Anthropocene" to describe our current era—one in which human impact on the environment has pushed Earth into an entirely new geological epoch—arguments for and against the new designation have been raging. Finally, an official working group of scientists was created to determine once and for all whether we humans have tossed one too many plastic bottles out the car window and wrought a change so profound as to be on par with the end of the last ice age. In summer 2016, the answer came back: Yes. In Making the Most of the Anthropocene, scientist Mark Denny tackles this hard truth head-on and considers burning questions: How did we reach our present technological and ecological state? How are we going to cope with our uncertain future? Will we come out of this, or are we doomed as a species? Is there anything we can do about what happens next? This book • explains what the Anthropocene is and why it is important• offers suggestions for minimizing harm instead of fretting about an impending environmental apocalypse • combines easy-to-grasp scientific, technological, economic, and anthropological analyses In Making the Most of the Anthopocene, there are no equations, no graphs, and no impenetrable jargon. Instead, you’ll find a fascinating cast of characters, including journalists from outer space, peppered moths, and unjustly maligned Polynesians. In his bright, lively voice, Denny envisions a future that balances reaction and reason, one in which humanity emerges bloody but unbowed—and in which those of us who are prepared can make the most of the Anthropocene.

The Weather Of The Future

Author: Heidi Cullen
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 006172694X
File Size: 46,32 MB
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Dr. Heidi Cullen, one of the world’s foremost climatologists and environmental journalists, offers a new way of viewing the climate-change phenomenon, not as some future event but as something happening right now in our own backyard. In this groundbreaking, provocative work, Dr. Cullen combines the latest scientific research with state-of-the-art climate-model projections to create climate-change scenarios for seven of the most at-risk locations around the globe. From the Central Valley of California, where coming droughts will jeopardize the entire state’s water supply, to New York City, whose infrastructure is extremely vulnerable to even a relatively weak Category 3 hurricane, to Greenland, where warmer temperatures will give access to mineral wealth buried beneath ice sheets for millennia, Cullen illustrates how, if left unabated, climate change will transform every corner of the world by midcentury—and no two regions will be affected in quite the same way.

Who Speaks For The Climate

Author: Maxwell T. Boykoff
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139501798
File Size: 65,86 MB
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The public rely upon media representations to help interpret and make sense of the many complexities relating to climate science and governance. Media representations of climate issues – from news to entertainment – are powerful and important links between people's everyday realities and experiences, and the ways in which they are discussed by scientists, policymakers and public actors. A dynamic mix of influences – from internal workings of mass media such as journalistic norms, to external political, economic, cultural and social factors – shape what becomes a climate 'story'. Providing a bridge between academic considerations and real world developments, this book helps students, academic researchers and interested members of the public make sense of media reporting on climate change as it explores 'who speaks for climate' and what effects this may have on the spectrum of possible responses to contemporary climate challenges.

Hurricane Watch

Author: Jack Williams
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0375713980
File Size: 53,44 MB
Format: PDF
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The ultimate guide to the ultimate storms, Hurricane Watch is a fascinating blend of science and history from one of the world's foremost meteorologists and an award-winning science journalist. This in-depth look at these awe-inspiring acts of nature covers everything from the earliest efforts by seafarers at predicting storms to the way satellite imaging is revolutionizing hurricane forecasting. It reveals the latest information on hurricanes: their effects on ocean waves, the causes of the variable wind speeds in different parts of the storm, and the origins of the super-cooled shafts of water that vent at high altitudes. Hurricane Watch is a compelling history of man's relationship with the deadliest storms on earth. Includes: - The story of the nineteenth-century Cuban Jesuit whose success at predicting the great cyclones was considered almost mystical. - A new look at Isaac Cline, whose infamous failure to predict the Galveston Hurricane left him obsessed with the devastating effects of storm surge. - The story of the Hurricane Hunters, including the first man ever to deliberately fly into a hurricane. - A complete account of how computer modeling has changed hurricane tracking. - A history of Project Stormfury: the only significant, organized effort to reduce the damaging strength of severe hurricanes. - A unique firsthand account of Hurricane Andrew by both authors, who were at the National Hurricane Center when Andrew struck. - A listing of the deadliest storms in history. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Philosophy And Climate Science

Author: Eric Winsberg
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108173888
File Size: 57,41 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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There continues to be a vigorous public debate in our society about the status of climate science. Much of the skepticism voiced in this debate suffers from a lack of understanding of how the science works - in particular the complex interdisciplinary scientific modeling activities such as those which are at the heart of climate science. In this book Eric Winsberg shows clearly and accessibly how philosophy of science can contribute to our understanding of climate science, and how it can also shape climate policy debates and provide a starting point for research. Covering a wide range of topics including the nature of scientific data, modeling, and simulation, his book provides a detailed guide for those willing to look beyond ideological proclamations, and enriches our understanding of how climate science relates to important concepts such as chaos, unpredictability, and the extent of what we know.

The Rough Guide To Weather

Author: Robert Henson
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1405384611
File Size: 35,93 MB
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Whether you’re an adventurer who enjoys wild weather, a traveller seeking climate details for Madagascar or Mumbai, or simply curious about those charts on the evening news, The Rough Guide to Weather is precisely what you need. From world climates and weather science to tips on how to read the sky and make sense of a forecast. Illustrated throughout with photographs and climate charts and useful links to hundreds of Internet resources for every continent, this guide is will help you stay a head of the storm.

Weather An Illustrated History

Author: Andrew Revkin
Publisher: Sterling
ISBN: 9781454921400
File Size: 50,17 MB
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Colorful and captivating, Weather An Illustrated History traces the history of weather and meteorology from prehistory to today's headlines in accessible, bite-sized stories. The descriptions touch on such varied topics as Earth's first atmosphere, the physics of rainbows, Groundhog Day, the Year Without Summer, our increasingly strong hurricanes, and climate diplomacy from Rio to Paris. Written by award-winning environmental writer Andrew Revkin, this is a groundbreaking illustrated book that chronologically traces the evolution of weather forecasting and climate science.

Making Climate Forecasts Matter

Author: National Research Council
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 030917340X
File Size: 45,78 MB
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El Nino has been with us for centuries, but now we can forcast it, and thus can prepare far in advance for the extreme climatic events it brings. The emerging ability to forecast climate may be of tremendous value to humanity if we learn how to use the information well. How does society cope with seasonal-to-interannual climatic variations? How have climate forecasts been used--and how useful have they been? What kinds of forecast information are needed? Who is likely to benefit from forecasting skill? What are the benefits of better forecasting? This book reviews what we know about these and other questions and identifies research directions toward more useful seasonal-to-interannual climate forecasts. In approaching their recommendations, the panel explores: Vulnerability of human activities to climate. State of the science of climate forecasting. How societies coevolved with their climates and cope with variations in climate. How climate information should be disseminated to achieve the best response. How we can use forecasting to better manage the human consequences of climate change.

A Vast Machine

Author: Paul N. Edwards
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262290715
File Size: 47,44 MB
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Global warming skeptics often fall back on the argument that the scientific case for global warming is all model predictions, nothing but simulation; they warn us that we need to wait for real data, "sound science." In A Vast Machine Paul Edwards has news for these skeptics: without models, there are no data. Today, no collection of signals or observations -- even from satellites, which can "see" the whole planet with a single instrument -- becomes global in time and space without passing through a series of data models. Everything we know about the world's climate we know through models. Edwards offers an engaging and innovative history of how scientists learned to understand the atmosphere -- to measure it, trace its past, and model its future.