Lost Japan

Author: Alex Kerr
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141979755
File Size: 10,87 MB
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An enchanting and fascinating insight into Japanese landscape, culture, history and future. Originally written in Japanese, this passionate, vividly personal book draws on the author's experiences in Japan over thirty years. Alex Kerr brings to life the ritualized world of Kabuki, retraces his initiation into Tokyo's boardrooms during the heady Bubble Years, and tells the story of the hidden valley that became his home. But the book is not just a love letter. Haunted throughout by nostalgia for the Japan of old, Kerr's book is part paean to that great country and culture, part epitaph in the face of contemporary Japan's environmental and cultural destruction. Winner of Japan's 1994 Shincho Gakugei Literature Prize. Alex Kerr is an American writer, antiques collector and Japanologist. Lost Japan is his most famous work. He was the first foreigner to be awarded the Shincho Gakugei Literature Prize for the best work of non-fiction published in Japan.

Lost Japan

Author: Alex Kerr
Publisher: Lonely Planet
ISBN:
File Size: 24,21 MB
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Kerr takes readers on a revealing backstage tour of an intriguing country. As he recounts his personal experiences of Japan over 30 years, the author warns that much of value is being lost under a tide of change--a message that has found widespread support among Japanese readers. Simultaneously a foreigner and an insider, Kerr brings a unique perspective to writing about contemporary Japan.

Lost Japan

Author:
Publisher:
ISBN: 9788891814968
File Size: 45,74 MB
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An collection of eighty pictures from the Alinari Archives located in Florence, Italy makes up a never-before-published sequence of images including portraits, landscapes, and rituals providing a rare entry into traditional 19th-century Japan. Felice Beato was one of the first Western photographers to enter Japan when the country first opened its borders (1853); he revealed to the Western world a country preserved in time and never seen before. In 1863 he moved to Yokohama and opened a photography school, the School of Yokohama. The photos of the book preserve the original photographic prints, manually coloured black-and-white prints, that truly embody the spirit of that period. Images feature fascinating portraits of women in kimonos, geishas, samurai warriors, and interiors of Japanese homes and gardens as well as scenes of everyday life including tea ceremonies or the theater. Each photo is accompanied by text providing historical, anthropological, and artistic context.

The Lost Wolves Of Japan

Author: Brett L. Walker
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 0295989939
File Size: 10,99 MB
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Many Japanese once revered the wolf as Oguchi no Magami, or Large-Mouthed Pure God, but as Japan began its modern transformation wolves lost their otherworldly status and became noxious animals that needed to be killed. By 1905 they had disappeared from the country. In this spirited and absorbing narrative, Brett Walker takes a deep look at the scientific, cultural, and environmental dimensions of wolf extinction in Japan and tracks changing attitudes toward nature through Japan's long history. Grain farmers once worshiped wolves at shrines and left food offerings near their dens, beseeching the elusive canine to protect their crops from the sharp hooves and voracious appetites of wild boars and deer. Talismans and charms adorned with images of wolves protected against fire, disease, and other calamities and brought fertility to agrarian communities and to couples hoping to have children. The Ainu people believed that they were born from the union of a wolflike creature and a goddess. In the eighteenth century, wolves were seen as rabid man-killers in many parts of Japan. Highly ritualized wolf hunts were instigated to cleanse the landscape of what many considered as demons. By the nineteenth century, however, the destruction of wolves had become decidedly unceremonious, as seen on the island of Hokkaido. Through poisoning, hired hunters, and a bounty system, one of the archipelago's largest carnivores was systematically erased. The story of wolf extinction exposes the underside of Japan's modernization. Certain wolf scientists still camp out in Japan to listen for any trace of the elusive canines. The quiet they experience reminds us of the profound silence that awaits all humanity when, as the Japanese priest Kenko taught almost seven centuries ago, we "look on fellow sentient creatures without feeling compassion."

Japanization

Author: William Pesek
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118780728
File Size: 51,78 MB
Format: PDF
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An in-depth look at Japan's economic malaise and the steps it must take to compete globally In Japanization, Bloomberg columnist William Pesek—based in Tokyo—presents a detailed look at Japan's continuing twenty-year economic slow-down, the political and economic reasons behind it, and the policies it could and should undertake to return to growth and influence. Despite new Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's promise of economic revitalization, investor optimism about the future, and plenty of potential, Japanization reveals why things are unlikely to change any time soon. Pesek argues that "Abenomics," as the new policies are popularly referred to, is nothing more than a dressed-up version of the same old fiscal and monetary policies that have left Japan with crippling debt, interest rates at zero, and constant deflation. He explores the ten forces that are stunting Japan's growth and offers prescriptions for fixing each one. Offers a skeptical counterpoint to the popular rosy narrative on the economic outlook for Japan Gives investors practical and detailed insight on the real condition of Japan's economy Reveals ten factors stunting Japan's growth and why they are unlikely to be solved any time soon Explains why most of what readers believe they know about Japan's economy is wrong Includes case studies of some of the biggest Japanese companies, including Olympus, Japan Airlines, Sony, and Toyota, among others For many investors, businesspeople, and economists, Japan's long economic struggle is difficult to comprehend, particularly given the economic advantages it appears to have over its neighbors. Japanization offers a ground-level look at why its problems continue and what it can do to change course.

Dogs And Demons

Author: Alex Kerr
Publisher: Hill and Wang
ISBN: 1466804505
File Size: 35,27 MB
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The crises--and failures--of modernization in Japan, as seen up close by a resident expert Japan is a nation in crisis, and the crisis goes far beyond its well-known economic plight. In Dogs and Demons, Alex Kerr chronicles the crisis on a broad scale, from the failure of Japan's banks and pension funds to the decline of its once magnificent modern cinema. The book takes up for the first time in the Western press subjects such as the nation's endangered environment--its seashores lined with concrete, its roads leading to nowhere in the mountains. It describes Japan's "monument frenzy," the destruction of old cities such as Kyoto and construction of drab new cities, and the attendant collapse of the tourist industry. All these unhealthy developments are, Kerr argues, the devastating boomerang effect of an educational and bureaucratic system designed to produce manufactured goods--and little else. A mere upturn in economic growth will not quickly remedy these severe internal problems, which Kerr calls a "failure of modernism." He assails the foreign experts who, often dependent on Japanese government and business support, fail to address these issues. Meanwhile, what of the Japanese people themselves? Kerr, a resident of Japan for thirty-five years, writes of them with humor and passion, for "passion," he says, "is part of the story. Millions of Japanese feel as heartbroken at what is going on as I do. My Japanese friends tell me, 'Please write this--for us.'"

Examining Japan S Lost Decades

Author: Yoichi Funabashi
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317503368
File Size: 54,17 MB
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This book examines five features of Japan’s ‘Lost Decades’: the speed of the economic decline in Japan compared to Japan’s earlier global prowess; a rapidly declining population; considerable political instability and failed reform attempts; shifting balances of power in the region and changing relations with Asian neighbouring nations; and the lingering legacy of World War Two. Addressing the question of why the decades were lost, this book offers 15 new perspectives ranging from economics to ideology and beyond. Investigating problems such as the risk-averse behaviour of Japan’s bureaucracy and the absence of strong political leadership, the authors analyse how the delay of ‘loss-cutting policies’ led to the 1997 financial crisis and a state of political gridlock where policymakers could not decide on firm strategies that would benefit national interests. To discuss the rebuilding of Japan, the authors argue that it is first essential to critically examine Japan’s ‘Lost Decades’ and this book offers a comprehensive overview of Japan’s recent 20 years of crisis. The book reveals that the ‘Lost Decades’ is not an issue unique to the Japanese context but has global relevance, and its study can provide important insights into challenges being faced in other mature economies. With chapters written by some of the world’s leading Japan specialists and chapters focusing on a variety of disciplines, this book will be of interest to students and scholars in the areas of Japan studies, Politics, International Relations, Security Studies, Government Policy and History.

Looking For The Lost

Author: Alan Booth
Publisher: Kodansha Amer Incorporated
ISBN:
File Size: 58,45 MB
Format: PDF
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"In his final work Alan Booth takes us on a fascinating journey by foot through three remote regions of Japan to search for the country's geographic and spiritual heart - and for the elusive connections between present and past, self and society. Looking for the Lost is a beautifully written, opinionated, and entertaining look at the life and slow death of a culture, and a poignant self-portrait of a writer also nearing death." "Booth's journeys begin in the far north, in the homeland of modern Japan's most famous outcast, the decadent novelist Osamu Dazai. His often hilarious encounters in the towns along the lonely, underdeveloped coast where Dazai grew up reveal a region caught between change and tradition, where the effects of Japan's economic miracle are only now being felt. Booth then explores the tangled wilds of southern Kyushu - the battlegrounds where Saigo Takamori, one of Japan's most-loved tragic heroes, led his small rebel army in a futile last stand against overwhelming government forces in 1877. Finally he turns to the mountains and rivers in central Japan where the Heike clan, defeated by the Genji in the epochal twelfth-century civil war, were said to have dispersed. The bloody fall of the Heike marked the decline of refined court culture, an aristocratic golden age that Japan still clings to, however tenuously, in a time of love hotels, tourist traps, and industrial sprawl."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Homecomings

Author: Yoshikuni Igarashi
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 023154135X
File Size: 43,38 MB
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Soon after the end of World War II, a majority of the nearly seven million Japanese civilians and serviceman posted overseas returned home. Heeding the call to rebuild, these soldiers helped remake Japan and enjoyed popularized accounts of their service. For those who took longer to return, such as the POWs detained in Siberian labor camps and the fighters who spent years hiding in the jungles of the South Pacific, coming home was more difficult. Their nation had moved on without them and resented the reminder of a humiliating, traumatizing defeat. Homecomings tells the story of these late-returning Japanese soldiers and their struggle to succeed in a newly peaceful and prosperous society. Some were more successful than others, but they all charted a common cultural terrain, one profoundly shaped by media representations of the earlier returnees. Japan had come to redefine its nationhood through these popular images. Homecomings explores what Japanese society accepted and rejected, complicating the definition of a postwar consensus and prolonging the experience of war for both Japanese soldiers and the nation. The book throws the postwar narrative of Japan’s recovery into question, exposing the deeper, subtler damage done to a country that only belatedly faced the implications of its loss.

The Quest For The Lost Nation

Author: Sebastian Conrad
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520259440
File Size: 27,41 MB
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Chronicles the Germany's and Japan's struggles to reclaim a defeated national past. This book compares the ways German and Japanese scholars revised national history after World War-II in the shadows of fascism, surrender and American occupation. It shows that the focus on the nation can be understood only within a transnational context.