Humans Of London

Author: Cathy Teesdale
Publisher: Michael O'Mara Books
ISBN: 9781910552421
File Size: 68,81 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Read: 7027
Download or Read Book

A magical collection of photographs and stories from the iconic streets of London. Capturing the inspiring, the moving, the surreal and the everyday, Cathy Teesdale has made it her mission to celebrate the extraordinary diversity of life found in London. Presenting over 250 photographs, she introduces us to the real people of London, their hopes, philosophies, troubles and stories. Since beginning the Humans of London Facebook page in late 2013, Cathy has travelled across the whole of the Greater London area, photographing and talking to strangers. This collection of personal encounters is the perfect antidote to feeling lost in a big city.

Against The Grain

Author: James C. Scott
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300231687
File Size: 46,80 MB
Format: PDF
Read: 3239
Download or Read Book

An account of all the new and surprising evidence now available for the beginnings of the earliest civilizations that contradict the standard narrative Why did humans abandon hunting and gathering for sedentary communities dependent on livestock and cereal grains, and governed by precursors of today’s states? Most people believe that plant and animal domestication allowed humans, finally, to settle down and form agricultural villages, towns, and states, which made possible civilization, law, public order, and a presumably secure way of living. But archaeological and historical evidence challenges this narrative. The first agrarian states, says James C. Scott, were born of accumulations of domestications: first fire, then plants, livestock, subjects of the state, captives, and finally women in the patriarchal family—all of which can be viewed as a way of gaining control over reproduction. Scott explores why we avoided sedentism and plow agriculture, the advantages of mobile subsistence, the unforeseeable disease epidemics arising from crowding plants, animals, and grain, and why all early states are based on millets and cereal grains and unfree labor. He also discusses the “barbarians” who long evaded state control, as a way of understanding continuing tension between states and nonsubject peoples.

Production Ergonomics

Author: Berlin Cecilia
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781911529125
File Size: 27,47 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Read: 9472
Download or Read Book

This book offers an orientation in the prerequisites for healthy and effective human work. It covers physical, cognitive and organizational aspects of ergonomics, and provides the individual perspective and that of groups/populations, ending with a look at global challenges that require workplaces to become more socially/economically sustainable.

Participatory Research In More Than Human Worlds

Author: Michelle Bastian
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317340876
File Size: 51,26 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Read: 138
Download or Read Book

Socio-environmental crises are currently transforming the conditions for life on this planet, from climate change, to resource depletion, biodiversity loss and long-term pollutants. The vast scale of these changes, affecting land, sea and air have prompted calls for the ‘ecologicalisation’ of knowledge. This book adopts a much needed ‘more-than-human’ framework to grasp these complexities and challenges. It contains multidisciplinary insights and diverse methodological approaches to question how to revise, reshape and invent methods in order to work with non-humans in participatory ways. The book offers a framework for thinking critically about the promises and potentialities of participation from within a more-than-human paradigm, and opens up trajectories for its future development. It will be of interest to those working in the environmental humanities, animal studies, science and technology studies, ecology, and anthropology.

An Introduction To Human Evolutionary Anatomy

Author: Leslie Aiello
Publisher: Academic Press
ISBN: 008057100X
File Size: 18,36 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Read: 6779
Download or Read Book

An anthropologist and an anatomist have combined their skills in this book to provide students and research workers with the essentials of anatomy and the means to apply these to investigations into hominid form and function. Using basic principles and relevant bones, conclusions can be reached regarding the probable musculature, stance, brain size, age, weight, and sex of a particular fossil specimen. The sort of deductions which are possible are illustrated by reference back to contemporary apes and humans, and a coherent picture of the history of hominid evolution appears. Written in a clear and concise style and beautifully illustrated, An Introduction to Human Evolutionary Anatomy is a basic reference for all concerned with human evolution as well as a valuable companion to both laboratory practical sessions and new research using fossil skeletons.

Humans And Machines At Work

Author: Phoebe V. Moore
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319582321
File Size: 69,47 MB
Format: PDF
Read: 8846
Download or Read Book

This edited collection provides a series of accounts of workers’ local experiences that reflect the ubiquity of work’s digitalisation. Precarious gig economy workers ride bikes and drive taxis in China and Britain; call centre workers in India experience invasive tracking; warehouse workers discover that hidden data has been used for layoffs; and academic researchers see their labour obscured by a ‘data foam’ that does not benefit them. These cases are couched in historical accounts of identity and selfhood experiments seen in the Hawthorne experiments and the lineage of automation. This book will appeal to scholars in the Sociology of Work and Digital Labour Studies and anyone interested in learning about monitoring and surveillance, automation, the gig economy and the quantified self in the workplace.

Routledge Handbook Of Human Security

Author: Mary Martin
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134619804
File Size: 32,10 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Read: 1723
Download or Read Book

This Handbook will serve as a standard reference guide to the subject of human security, which has grown greatly in importance over the past twenty years. Human security has been part of academic and policy discourses since it was first promoted by the UNDP in its 1994 Human Development Report. Filling a clear gap in the current literature, this volume brings together some of the key scholars and policy-makers who have contributed to its emergence as a mainstream concept, including Nobel prize winner Amartya Sen and Sadako Ogata, who jointly chaired the 2001 Commission on Human Security. Drawing upon a range of theoretical and empirical analyses, the Handbook provides examples of the use of human security in policies as diverse as disaster management, arms control and counter-terrorism, and in different geographic and institutional settings from Asia to Africa, and the UN. It also raises important questions about how the concept might be adapted and operationalised in future. Over the course of the book, the authors draw on three key aspects of human security thinking: Theoretical issues to do with defining human security as a specific discourse Human security from a policy and institutional perspective, and how it is operationalised in different policy and geographic contexts Case studies and empirical work Featuring some of the leading scholars in the field, the Routledge Handbook of Human Security will be essential reading for all students of human security, critical security, conflict and development, peace and conflict studies, and of great interest to students of international security and IR in general. ?

Experimenting With Humans And Animals

Author: Anita Guerrini
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 9780801871979
File Size: 41,35 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Read: 3068
Download or Read Book

Ethical questions about the use of animals and humans in research remain among the most vexing within both the scientific community and society at large. These often rancorous arguments have gone on, however, with little awareness of their historical antecedents. Experimentation on animals and particularly humans is often assumed to be a uniquely modern phenomenon, but the ideas and attitudes that encourage the biological and medical sciences to experiment on living creatures date from the earliest expression of Western thought. Here, Anita Guerrini looks at the history of these practices from vivisection in ancient Alexandria to present-day battles over animal rights and medical research employing human subjects. Guerrini discusses key historical episodes, including the discovery of blood circulation, the development of smallpox and polio vaccines, and recent AIDS research. She also explores the rise of the antivivisection movement in Victorian England, the modern animal rights movement, and current debates over gene therapy.--From publisher description.

Humans Of New York Stories

Author: Brandon Stanton
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 1250099854
File Size: 36,35 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Read: 8541
Download or Read Book

Now a #1 New York Times Bestseller! In the summer of 2010, photographer Brandon Stanton began an ambitious project -to single-handedly create a photographic census of New York City. The photos he took and the accompanying interviews became the blog Humans of New York. His audience steadily grew from a few hundred followers to, at present count, over eighteen million. In 2013, his book Humans of New York, based on that blog, was published and immediately catapulted to the top of the NY Times Bestseller List where it has appeared for over forty-five weeks. Now, Brandon is back with the Humans of New York book that his loyal followers have been waiting for: Humans of New York: Stories. Ever since Brandon began interviewing people on the streets of New York, the dialogue he's had with them has increasingly become as in-depth, intriguing and moving as the photos themselves. Humans of New York: Stories presents a whole new group of people in stunning photographs, with a rich design and, most importantly, longer stories that delve deeper and surprise with greater candor. Let Brandon Stanton and the Humans of New York he's photographed astonish you all over again.

The City Is More Than Human

Author: Frederick L. Brown
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 0295999357
File Size: 72,10 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Read: 6786
Download or Read Book

Winner, 2017 Virginia Marie Folkins Award, Association of King County Historical Organizations (AKCHO) Seattle would not exist without animals. Animals have played a vital role in shaping the city from its founding amid existing indigenous towns in the mid-nineteenth century to the livestock-friendly town of the late nineteenth century to the pet-friendly, livestock-averse modern city. When newcomers first arrived in the 1850s, they hastened to assemble the familiar cohort of cattle, horses, pigs, chickens, and other animals that defined European agriculture. This, in turn, contributed to the dispossession of the Native residents of the area. However, just as these animals were used to create a Euro-American city, the elimination of these same animals from Seattle was key to the creation of the new middle-class neighborhoods of the twentieth century. As dogs and cats came to symbolize home and family, Seattleites� relationship with livestock became distant and exploitative, demonstrating the deep social contradictions that characterize the modern American metropolis. Throughout Seattle�s history, people have sorted animals into categories and into places as a way of asserting power over animals, other people, and property. In The City Is More Than Human, Frederick Brown explores the dynamic, troubled relationship humans have with animals. In so doing he challenges us to acknowledge the role of animals of all sorts in the making and remaking of cities.