America S Uncivil Wars

Author: Mark H. Lytle
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0195174976
File Size: 25,15 MB
Format: PDF
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'America's Uncivil Wars' explores the social & cultural issues that preoccupied America in the years 1954-1974.

Modern Wittenberg

Author: William A. Kinnison
Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
ISBN: 9781462860593
File Size: 36,62 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Whatever happened to America's small, private, residential, undergraduate, Liberal Arts Colleges? Will they survive the present contest with pragmatic publicly supported community colleges and the secular mega universities? The story of Wittenberg, one of the best of Ohio's many good Liberal Arts Colleges, provides answers to such questions. It looks at this critical period in their history giving hope that the very best of them will prosper. They are an endangered national resource that should be preserved and no more of them are being started. The book is written both for the casual reader and for historians and professional educators.

1969

Author: Rob Kirkpatrick
Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.
ISBN: 1626366187
File Size: 32,35 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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In 1969, man landed on the moon; the “Miracle Mets” captivated sports fans; students took over college campuses and demonstrators battled police; America witnessed the Woodstock music festival; Hollywood produced Easy Rider; Kurt Vonnegut published Slaughterhouse-Five; punk music was born; and there was murder at Altamont Speedway. Compelling, timely, and a blast to read, 1969 chronicles the year in culture and society, sports, music, film, politics, and technology. This rich, comprehensive history is perfect for those who survived 1969 or for those who simply want to feel as though they did.

The United States Since 1945

Author: Robert P. Ingalls
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1405167130
File Size: 64,61 MB
Format: PDF
Read: 405
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Encompassing political, social, and cultural issues, this primary source reader allows students to hear the voices of the past, giving a richer understanding of American society since 1945. Comprises over 50 documents, which incorporate political, social, and cultural history and encompass the viewpoints of ordinary people as well a variety of leaders An extended introduction explains to students how to think and work like historians by using primary sources Includes both written texts and photographs Headnotes contextualize the documents and questions encourage students to engage critically with the sources

Cosmic Cowboys And New Hicks

Author: Travis D. Stimeling
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199831912
File Size: 24,32 MB
Format: PDF
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Country music of the late 1960s and early 1970s was a powerful symbol of staunch conservative resistance to the emerging counterculture. But starting around 1972, the city of Austin, Texas became host to a growing community of musicians, entrepreneurs, journalists, and fans who saw country music as a part of their collective heritage and sought to merge it with countercultural ideals to forge a distinctly Texan counterculture. Progressive country music-a hybrid of country music and rock-blossomed in this growing Austin community, as it played out the contradictions at work among its residents. The music was at once firmly grounded in the traditional Texan culture in which they had been raised, and profoundly affected by their newly radicalized, convention-flouting ways. In Cosmic Cowboys and New Hicks: The Countercultural Sounds of Austin's Progressive Country Music Scene, Travis Stimeling connects the local Austin culture and the progressive music that became its trademark. He presents a colorful range of evidence, from behavior and dress, to newspaper articles, to personal interviews of musicians. Along the way, Stimeling uncovers parodies of the cosmic cowboy image that reinforce the longing for a more peaceful way of life, but that also recognize an awareness of the muddled, conflicted nature of this counterculture identity. Cosmic Cowboys and New Hicks provides new insight into the inner workings of Austin's progressive country music scene-by bringing the music and musicians brilliantly to life.

Cult Film Stardom

Author: K. Egan
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 113729177X
File Size: 44,44 MB
Format: PDF
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The term 'cult film star' has been employed in popular journalistic writing for the last 25 years, but what makes cult stars distinct from other film stars has rarely been addressed. This collection explores the processes through which film stars/actors become associated with the cult label, from Bill Murray to Ruth Gordon and Ingrid Pitt.

Stopping The Plant

Author: Miriam D. Silverman
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 0791480747
File Size: 61,68 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Detailed account of the controversy surrounding the building of a coal-fired cement factory in the Hudson Valley.

Framing The Sixties

Author: Bernard von Bothmer
Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press
ISBN: 9781558497320
File Size: 39,65 MB
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Over the past quarter century, American liberals and conservatives alike have invoked memories of the 1960s to define their respective ideological positions and to influence voters. Liberals recall the positive associations of what might be called the "good Sixties"--the "Camelot" years of JFK, the early civil rights movement, and the dreams of the Great Society--while conservatives conjure images of the "bad Sixties"--a time of urban riots, antiwar protests, and countercultural revolt. In Framing the Sixties, Bernard von Bothmer examines this battle over the collective memory of the decade primarily through the lens of presidential politics. He shows how four presidents--Ronald Reagan, George H. W. Bush, Bill Clinton, and George W. Bush--each sought to advance his political agenda by consciously shaping public understanding of the meaning of "the Sixties." He compares not only the way that each depicted the decade as a whole, but also their commentary on a set of specific topics: the presidency of John F. Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson's "Great Society" initiatives, the civil rights movement, and the Vietnam War. In addition to analyzing the pronouncements of the presidents themselves, von Bothmer draws on interviews he conducted with more than one hundred and twenty cabinet members, speechwriters, advisers, strategists, historians, journalists, and activists from across the political spectrum--from Julian Bond, Daniel Ellsberg, Todd Gitlin, and Arthur Schlesinger to James Baker, Robert Bork, Phyllis Schlafly, and Paul Weyrich. It is no secret that the upheavals of the 1960s opened fissures within American society that have continued to affect the nation's politics and to intensify its so-called culture wars. What this book documents is the extent to which political leaders, left and right, consciously exploited those divisions by "framing" the memory of that turbulent decade to serve their own partisan interests.

Loose Change

Author: Sara Davidson
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520209107
File Size: 54,29 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This is a compelling story of the experiences of three young women who attended the University of California at Berkeley and became caught up in the tumultuous changes of the Sixties. Sara Davidson follows the three--Susie, Tasha, and Sara herself--from their first meeting in 1962, through the events that "radicalized" them in unexpected ways in the decade after the years in Berkeley. Susie navigates through the Free Speech Movement and the early women's movement in Berkeley, and Tasha enters the trendy New York art and society scene. Sara, a journalist, travels the country reporting on the stories of the sixties. The private lives that Davidson reconstructs are set against the public background of the time. Figures such as Timothy Leary, Mario Savio, Tom Hayden, and Joan Baez are here, as are the many young people who sought alternatives to "the establishment" through whatever means seemed worth exploring: radical politics, meditation, drugs, group sex, or dropping out. Davidson's honest and detailed chronicle reveals the hopes, confusion, and disillusionment of a generation whose rites of passage defined one of the most contentious decades of this century.

Reinventing Richard Nixon

Author: Daniel E. Frick
Publisher:
ISBN:
File Size: 48,94 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The author focuses on the process of Richard Nixon's continuous reinvention in an intriguing study that reveals a figure who continues to expose key fault lines in the nation's self-definition.